June 6, 1844 – Young Men’s Christian Association

George Williams is a reminder that we can serve God right where we are. He was successful in the cloth-making (or drapery) business in Victorian England and saw how deplorably most business people treated their employees. So he and a few fellow-drapery manufacturing owners met on June 6, 1844 and formed the Young Men’s Christian Association (Y.M.C.A.). YMCAs then spread …

June 5, 1851 – Uncle Tom’s Cabin

There are about a dozen books (depending on who is counting) that Americans can say made a huge political or social impact and Uncle Tom’s Cabin was certainly one of them. It was first published as a serial in a magazine called the National Era on June 5, 1851. The author, Harriet Beecher Stowe, was a committed Christian who felt …

June 4, 1639 – Fundamental Orders of New Haven

The revisionist history people who want to deny America’s founding on Christian principles crack me up. How they can gloss-over facts is both laughable and sad. When the founders of New Haven, CT decided to have a government, they produced the Fundamental Orders of New Haven on June 4, 1639. The document, pictured here, was developed in a barn and …

June 3, 1905 – Hudson Taylor

The Foreign Missionary Hall of Fame (if there was one) would certainly include Hudson Taylor as one of the founding inductees. Born in England to devout Christian parents, Taylor initially rejected the faith but during his time in medical school began to see the Light. His parents had long been focused/interested in those nations that had never heard the name …

June 2, 1901 – George Leslie Mackay

The first missionary commissioned by the Canadian Presbyterian Church was George Leslie Mackay who died of throat cancer on June 2, 1901. He spent his life in Taiwan (at that time called Formosa) and wanted to show the Chinese people how much he loved them and how much God loves them that he married a Chinese woman which was NOT …

June 1, 1826 – John F. Oberlin

Oberlin College rests about 35 miles from Cleveland, Ohio and boasts a strong liberal arts education and renowned music conservatory. It was named for missionary John F. Oberlin who worked with poor, remote villagers in the Alsace-Lorraine valley region of France (pictured here) and not only taught them the gospel but practical trade skills. After Oberlin died on June 1, …

May 31, 2007 – Billy Graham (part II)

Just last week we took a look at Billy Graham’s first major sermon with Youth for Christ and now we look at his legacy. The Billy Graham Library was dedicated on May 31, 2007 and there were plenty of dignitaries on hand to wish him well including three living U.S. Presidents: George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter. Here …

May 30, 1431 – Joan of Arc

One of the most famous women in Christian history is Joan of Arc. The Hundred Years’ War between France and England was bitter and long-fought (that’s how you get the name 100 years’ worth of war!) over the control of France and this peasant girl named Joan from the Orleans district joined the fight. Convinced she was told by the …

May 29, 1453 – Fall of Constantinople

The Protestant Reformation didn’t just start the day Martin Luther nailed the 95 Theses to the Castle Church doors in Wittenberg, Germany on Halloween 1517. The influence of Greek thought and literature and a renewal of “critical thinking” called humanism (it has a different connotation today) increased because western Europe had access to many more Greek books and literature. One …

May 28, 1941 – Maximilian Kolbe

Maximilian Kolbe was a Polish Franciscan priest who created a very effective friary just outside Warsaw in 1936. When the Nazis invaded Poland three years later, Kolbe knew it was a matter of time before he would be at odds with the authorities. He ended up on May 28, 1941 being sentenced to Auschwitz and continued to make an impact …