March 22, 337 – Constantine

Did you ever hear “be careful what you ask for”? After the Roman Emperor Diocletian issued his “Edict Against the Christians” in 303 AD, when Constantine became emperor all that went away and Christianity would not only be allowed but eventually official. Before he died on March 22, 337, Constantine put the Roman Emperor as the titular head of the …

March 21, 1778 – Charles Wesley

This monument honors one of the greatest hymn writers of all time. When you write “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” “O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing,” “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling,” “Jesus, Lover of My Soul,” and “Christ the Lord Is Risen Today” you deserve a statue. Charles Wesley died on March 21, 1778.

March 20, 1858 – John Gossner

When is the last time you were told “you are just too evangelical”? John Gossner was kicked out of Russia by the Tsar and kicked out of the Catholic church by the Pope for just that very reason. Gossner believed Christians should have their spiritual life drawn from direct contact with God and not through priests. He died on March …

March 19, 1907 – Charles Harrison Mason

The Church of God in Christ (COGIC) had it’s beginning in Lexington, Mississippi in 1897. However it didn’t begin to grow into a national denomination until it’s founder Charles Harrison Mason had a baptism of the Holy Spirit at a Pentecostal revival in Los Angeles on March 19, 1907.

March 18, 1980 – Mr. Edmonds

As the world watches how Christians are being persecuted in modern Middle Eastern counties, it isn’t the first time. On March 18, 1980 a Christian student at the University of Alexandria, Egypt refused to deny his faith to an angry group of students. The students then beat the young man, known only as “Mr. Edmonds”, to unconsciousness and broke his …

March 17, 461 – The Real “Saint” Patrick

Here are a couple of things you may not know about St. Patrick (who was a real guy who died on March 17, 461): 1. There were never any snakes in Ireland so he didn’t really run them out, 2. He has never been officially made a saint, and 3. He’s not Irish. What you should know is he was …

March 16, 1895 – John Albert Broadus

Known as the “Prince of the Pulpit” John Albert Broadus was a solid figure in Southern Baptist circles. A former pastor of the Charlottesville, VA Baptist Church and professor at the University of Virginia, he co-founded the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary when in Greenville, South Carolina (because of the Civil War it was relocated to its present day campus in …

March 15, 1517 – Indulgences

My guess is that if Pope Leo X knew what he would set off by allowing the sales of indulgences on March 15, 1517, he’d re-think that one. The building of St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican had gone way over budget (it would be almost 80 years until it would be completed) and the Pope’s financial adviser suggested the …

March 14, 1661 – William Leddra

From the very beginning of the Puritan colony of Massachusetts, Quakers were beaten or branded with an H for being a heretic. When those efforts didn’t stop them from preaching that Jesus could be known intimately without church rituals, some like William Leddra were hanged. On March 14, 1661 Leddra (pictured here) was the last to hang for the crime …

March 13, 1925 – Scopes Monkey Trial

It would be interesting to know if the State of Tennessee knew when it passed “the Butler Bill” on March 13, 1925 that the world would soon be watching. House Bill 185, offered by State Representative John Washington Butler pictured here, prohibited teaching evolution in public schools and a teacher in Dayton, TN named John Scopes decided he’d teach it …