April 11, 1861 – WMUS

The Women’s Union Missionary Society of America for Heathen Lands doesn’t sound like a real catchy title that was created by an advertising focus group but when Sarah Platt Doremus founded it on April 11, 1861 cute titles were not her focus. She and other women were moved by a talk from a missionary to Burma about the plight of …

April 10, 1868 – Brahms’ German Requiem

Johannes Brahms (one of the “Three B’s” with Beethoven and Bach) wrote numerous symphonies and concertos as well as his famous Lullaby. One of his most important pieces was the German Requiem which was first heard in its entirety on April 10, 1868 when it was performed at the cathedral in Bremen, Germany pictured here. He used entire passages from …

April 9, 1934 – Louisa Lee

When Louisa Lee finished college with a teaching degree in her native state of Washington in 1911, twenty-two years later she had finished her first tour of duty with Presbyterian USA Missions in India. However she disagreed with the leadership when they told her they no longer accepted the authority and inerrancy of Scripture so she left the Presbyterian USA …

April 8, 1545 – Council of Trent

One of the mottoes of the Protestant Reformation was Sola Scriptura which is Latin for “only Scripture” which meant the reformers based all doctrine only on the Bible. The counter-reformation undertaken by the Roman Catholic Church had its ecclesiastical beginnings at the Council of Trent in Trento, Italy in 1545 and it lasted several years. On April 8, 1548 the …

April 7, 2007 – Johnny Hart

Millions have read the B.C. comic strip created by cartoonist Johnny Hart who died on April 7, 2007. While raised in a Christian home, Hart did not take his faith seriously until later in his life and he used the power of his comic strip B.C. and others (like the Wizard of Id) to share his faith. Some protested to …

April 6, 1593 – Henry Barrowe and John Greenwood

Many Americans fail to keep in mind that the Pilgrims who landed at Plymouth Rock were fleeing persecution from the Church of England and not the Roman Catholic Church. Henry Barrowe and John Greenwood are good examples of the persecution. Barrowe and Greenwood were leaders in the Puritan movement and they made the case to leaders in the Church of …

April 5, 1811 – Robert Raikes

Did you go to Sunday School today? If so, you can thank Robert Raikes who died on April 5, 1811 in Gloucester, England. Raikes was a printer who couldn’t understand why there were so many young children known as “white slaves” getting into trouble on Sundays. He learned they worked in factories 6 days a week and most of their …

April 4, 1634 – Simon Episcopius

In the early 1600’s the discussion of Calvinism grew to a heated debate known as the Synod of Dort which took place in Amsterdam, Holland in 1618. The lead opponent of Calvinism was Jacob Hermann better known under his Latinized name Jacobus Arminius and we now call the theology Arminianism which sounds better than not-Reformed-Calvinist. Arminius’ student and a leader …

April 3, 1826 – Bishop Reginald Heber

Before he died at age 42, Reginald Heber had been a world traveler from his home in England. He spent considerable time travelling Scandinavia and Russia and settled in India as an Anglican missionary. Eventually he was named bishop for Calcutta (where this picture of a statue of him was taken) but one of his passions was poetry from his …

April 2, 1914 – Assemblies of God

What happens when the Holy Spirit and a “city of sin” meet? On April 2, 1914 over 300 Pentecostals converged at the Grand Opera House in Hot Springs, Arkansas for a convention. After meeting for 10 days the result was a lot of good preaching and the birth of the Assemblies of God denomination.