February 15, 1905 – Lew Wallace

How would you like these titles: New Mexico territorial governor. Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. Union Army General. Author of “the most influential Christian book of the 19th century”? Lew Wallace gets all of these and more. You probably guessed by the picture which influential book he wrote but did you know the full title is Ben-Hur: A Tale of …

February 1, 1933 – Dietrich Bonhoeffer

As the Nazi regime grew in power, very few voices were willing to step up and call into question what Hitler was doing to Germany. One of the voices who was willing was the Lutheran pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He gave a national radio address on February 1, 1933 where he reminded the audience there was a large risk in putting …

February 19, 1414 – Thomas Arundel

What do you have to do to make the list of the 10 Worst Brits in the last 1,000 years? The BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) History Magazine compiled a list and Thomas Arundel, the former Archbishop of Canterbury who died on February 19, 1414, joined the ranks of Jack the Ripper and King John (undoubtedly the worst king of England …

January 31, 1892 – Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Besides being one of the greatest preachers of all time, Charles Haddon Spurgeon also developed numerous commentaries and even trained pastors to be pastors. By the time he died on January 31, 1892 at age 57, it is estimated over 900 pastors went through his seminary. This is a picture of his grave shared by his wife Susanna from their …

January 30, 1536 – Menno Simons

How did Mennonites get their name? A former Catholic priest named Menno Simons renounced Catholicism on January 30, 1536 and was “re-baptized” by Anabaptist leader Obbe Philips. He later went on to write extensively about doctrine and theology and from his work the Mennonites were formed.

January 29, 1882 – Endicott Peabody

Endicott Peabody was a true renaissance man for his day. On January 29, 1882, he arrived fresh from what is now Boston’s Episcopal Divinity School in Tombstone, Arizona just months after the famed shoot out at the OK Corral. He went on to establish St. Paul’s Episcopal Church (pictured here) in Tombstone and from there back to Boston where he …

January 28, 1547 – Edward VI

There is plenty of good reason to debate King Henry VIII’s theology. While he was surely became “un-aligned” with the Church in Rome, the Church of England at that time was clearly no bastion of Protestantism. So the theology of Henry’s successor was very important when his young son Edward VI took the throne on January 28, 1547. Edward’s advisers …

January 27, 1343 – Pope Clement VI

Indulgences granted by the Pope – and the abuse of the sale of them – was a critical component of Martin Luther’s “protesting” with the 95 Theses he nailed to the Wittenberg church doors. Indulgences were approved by Pope Clement VI on January 27, 1343. This is a picture of Pope Clement.

January 26, 1949 – Peter Marshall

Peter Marshall, not the guy who hosted Hollywood Squares, was incredibly effective as a Presbyterian minister but most remembered for his time of service as the chaplain in the United States Senate. Marshall served in that post only a few years but became much better known through a biography-turned-movie written by his wife Catherine called A Man Called Peter. Chaplain …

January 25, 1964 – Irene Ferrel

What are most of us willing to do to spread the gospel? For Irene Ferrel that meant going into the heart of the Belgian Congo in 1964 right in the midst of a horrendous coup. The Congo was breaking away from its colonial rule from Belgian and Irene, a 42 year old unmarried teacher and graduate of the Fundamental Bible …