March 28, 1871 – Ignatius von Döllinger

When the First Vatican Council met from 1869-1870 one of the subjects that became a dogmatic teaching was the infallibility of the Pope. That means the Pope can not make a mistake and he is perfect. One German priest didn’t buy into that named Ignatius von Döllinger who said, “As a Christian, as a theologian, as a historian, as a …

March 27, 1378 – Pope Gregory XI

Will the real Pope please stand? There was a time in the 1300’s and 1400’s where up to three men claimed to be the Pope at the same time. Some of them were headquartered in Avignon, France and not in Rome as you might think so it was battle of the popes-and-the-antipopes. Pope Gregory XI was the last universally-accepted of …

March 26, 1831 – Bishop Richard Allen

The African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1794. It’s founder, and first bishop, was Richard Allen who died on March 26, 1831. Born a slave on a Delaware plantation, Allen taught himself to read and write and instituted Sabbath Schools as a part of his first churches to help make black parishioners more literate.

March 25, 815 – Theodore the Studite

Pope Leo III, who was the first to crown a monarch when he crowned Charlemagne Holy Roman Emperor, said the church no longer needs to use icons of former saints and priests and “outlaws” them. The Eastern Church didn’t buy into that and Theodore the Studite, in an act of defiance, marched on March 25, 815 with his fellow monks …

March 24, 1603 – Queen Elizabeth I

For almost 75 years during the 1500s England would flip back and forth between the official church being Roman Catholic or the Church of England. When Queen Elizabeth I died on March 24, 1603 there was a question if England would stay Protestant but her cousin and successor King James I sealed the deal and it’s been the Church of …

March 23, 1532 – Last Anabaptists Drowned

Anabaptist is the derogatory name given to Protestants in the 16th century who didn’t believe in infant baptism. Anabaptists believed an infant can’t decide for herself/himself to accept Christ so they were “re-baptized” and labeled heretics. To ensure discipline and a bit of irony, instead of being burned at the stake by their fellow Protestant brothers for refusing to recant, …

March 22, 337 – Constantine

Did you ever hear “be careful what you ask for”? After the Roman Emperor Diocletian issued his “Edict Against the Christians” in 303 AD, when Constantine became emperor all that went away and Christianity would not only be allowed but eventually official. Before he died on March 22, 337, Constantine put the Roman Emperor as the titular head of the …

March 21, 1778 – Charles Wesley

This monument honors one of the greatest hymn writers of all time. When you write “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” “O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing,” “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling,” “Jesus, Lover of My Soul,” and “Christ the Lord Is Risen Today” you deserve a statue. Charles Wesley died on March 21, 1778.

March 20, 1858 – John Gossner

When is the last time you were told “you are just too evangelical”? John Gossner was kicked out of Russia by the Tsar and kicked out of the Catholic church by the Pope for just that very reason. Gossner believed Christians should have their spiritual life drawn from direct contact with God and not through priests. He died on March …

March 19, 1907 – Charles Harrison Mason

The Church of God in Christ (COGIC) had it’s beginning in Lexington, Mississippi in 1897. However it didn’t begin to grow into a national denomination until it’s founder Charles Harrison Mason had a baptism of the Holy Spirit at a Pentecostal revival in Los Angeles on March 19, 1907.