July 12, 1944 – Golden Gate Seminary chartered

On July 12, 1944 Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary was chartered under the direction of the Southern Baptist Convention. Originally headquartered in Mill Valley, California the seminary recently changed its name to Gateway Seminary, sold their Mill Valley campus and have relocated to the main campus in Ontario, California. This is a picture of the new location.

July 11, 1533 – Henry VIII excommunicated

I’m not sure what kind mojo Anne Boleyn had but it was enough to get King Henry VIII excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church on July 11, 1533. This is right in the middle of discussion I do when I teach the History of the Bible. Henry wanted a divorce from his wife Catherine of Aragon (whose Mama and Daddy …

July 10, 1509 – John Calvin born

I’m not sure John Calvin’s influence on Protestant Christian theology can be measured – it’s sort of like saying “there are a lot of stars in the sky” or “the Grand Canyon is big”. Born on this day in Noyon, France, he would continue to preach until his very last days. His book The Institutes of the Christian Religion is …

July 9, 1228 – Archbishop Stephen Langton died

When I teach the History of the Bible one of my slides is of Archbishop of Canterbury Stephen Langton who died on July 9, 1228. The Archbishop (this is a statue of him at Westminster Abbey) makes the cut on Bible history because he’s the one we thank – or blame – for inserting chapters into Scripture. So, if we …

July 8, 1663 – Rhode Island chartered

Ever heard that big things come in small packages? When the colony of Rhode Island was chartered on July 8, 1663 it was completely different from the other colonies. One difference was that the colonists had to buy their land from the Native Americans living there. Another was a religious provision that stated “to secure them in the free exercise …

July 7, 1873 – Lottie Moon appointed

In Southern Baptist denomination work, Lottie Moon is a rock star of the first order. Her story, of leaving her secure school teaching job, and heading to China after she was appointed on July 7, 1873 has inspired naming the annual foreign missions offering each Christmas after her. She made an impact with her new Chinese friends by offering them …

July 6, 1415 – Jan Hus burned at the stake

Way before Martin Luther took the steps in reforming the church, he stood on the shoulders of several valiant theologians and church leaders who blazed the trail before Marty was on scene. One major figure was Jan (or Jon) Hus from Prague. Hus dared to question the authority of the pope, and the priesthood in general, but was keenly focused …

July 5, 1844 – Kensington Riots

Immigrants taking “American native” jobs was just the beginning of the problems that caused the Kensington Riots in Philadelphia, PA in 1844. Philadelphia’s Irish Catholic immigrant population was booming and “native” Americans were increasingly angry when the Irish would work for less wages. At St. Phillip Neri’s Catholic Church in the Kensington district, the first free Catholic School in the …

July 2, 1752 – Algonquian Bible translation

The first Bible printed in America was for the first Americans: the native American Algonquian people. When it was printed on July 2, 1752, it was cheaper to buy an English Bible from England so printing in the colonies was prohibitive. However, a man named John Eliot wanted Native Americans to read the Word so he had the Bible translated …

July 1, 1903 – Geronimo baptized

From the very earliest days of the European exploration of North America, a prime focus was to convert Native Americans to Christianity (it wasn’t always a pretty picture). On July 1, 1903 the great Apache chief Geronimo was baptized into the Methodist Church at Medicine Creek in the Oklahoma territory.