September 19, 1853 – China Inland Mission

Missionary Super Star Hudson Taylor believed people from foreign nations would best be open to hearing the Gospel if missionaries adapted to the native peoples’ culture. Hudson, his family and 16 other families set sail from England on September 19, 1853 for China and would form the China Inland Mission 12 years later. The organization is still in operation but …

September 18, 1975 – Te Deum Day

The Pentecostal movement in Chile saw continued growth from seeds planted as early as 1910.  It eventually grew away from the Methodist churches which began the Protestantism in this very Roman Catholic country.  One culmination of the Pentecostal movement’s influence occurred at the annual Te Deum Day service which celebrates Chile’s independence from Spain.  On September 18, 1975, for the …

September 17, 1717 – First Presbyterian Synod

Some of the first Reformed church leaders to come to the English American colonies were Presbyterians who started congregations as early as the late 1600s. As the denomination grew along the eastern US seaboard, it was decided the local congregations (known as presbyteries) needed to become more coordinated with each other by forming a synod of the local presbyteries. On …

September 16, 1498 – Tomas de Torquemada

Surely one of the darkest stains of misusing the name of Christ was the Spanish Inquisition that took place during the reign of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain.  Used as a way to force Jews and others to recant their faith and accept Christ, the Inquisition would see over 2,000 people burned at the stake and even more …

September 15, 1648 – Larger and Shorter Catechisms

In the midst of the English Civil War, on September 15, 1648 the British Parliament approves both the Larger and Shorter Catechisms. The Puritan-controlled Parliament had passed the Westminster Confession of Faith some two years before.

September 14, 1741 – The Messiah

In just 24 days, on September 14, 1741, George Frederick Handel completed his best-known work The Messiah.  Having already suffered a stroke when he began, Handel credits drinking a lot of coffee for creating an almost error-free manuscript of 259 pages of music.  They don’t call it “The Halleluiah Chorus” for nothing.  

September 13, 1635 – Roger Williams

Roger Williams, who founded the first Baptist church in the American colonies, is banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for several infractions on September 13, 1635.  His primary offense is his strong belief in the separation of church and state – which the Founding Fathers will implement in the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights some 150 years later.  …

September 12, 1803 – Stone-Campbell movement

Barton Stone, along with others in the Kentucky Synod of the Presbyterian Church, were censured for their disbelief in the Trinity, predestination and election – as well as other doctrines. What became known as the Stone-Campbell movement began on September 12, 1803 when the Springfield Presbytery is formed. The Stone-Campbell movement would eventually become the founding of the Church of …

September 11, 813 – Louis the Pious

As Charlemagne the Great, the first-ever Holy Roman Emperor, prepared for his death, he named his only surviving son Louis to be co-emperor with him on September 11, 813. Louis became known as Louis the Pious because he sought to bring the empire closer to God by cleansing the public courts of pagan images and also did public penance before …

September 10, 1718 – The Collegiate School at New Haven

A few days back we noted the founding of Harvard College in 1636 by Puritans in Massachusetts to serve as a ministerial school. In 1701 a group of Congregationalists felt Harvard was straying too far away from teaching Calvinism and started The Collegiate School at New Haven, Connecticut. On September 10, 1718 the Congregationalists changed the name of their divinity …